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and how sweden's top company plans to grow in the united states. britain's's pan european disclosed discussing a union to create a 93 billion dollar titan that would be the world's largest aerospace and defense company. deal if approved by global regulators would join europe's leading military and aerospace contractors into a new giant that builds commercial cargo fighter trainer aircraft helicopters and rockets and saturdayel lights missiles and radars and other sophisticated electronics communication systems and security products. the companys proprosed the -- proposed complex ownership ada holding 68% and bae40%. to alie security concerns executives have promised to operate bae's vast operation independently of the new parent. what does the deal mean globally what's next and what will government regulators be focusing on. join us is stev. grundman who analyzes and reviewed defense mergers and acquisition at the pentagon during the clinton administration and he advices defense and aerospace companies worldwide and has absolutely no stake in this particular transaction. >> no. righ
, with shepard smith. >>shepard: breaking news in the coordinated attack on the united states consulate in libya and murder of the united states ambassador on 9/11. there is no apparent to it. he was absolutely murdered. lib al-libi -- libyan officials made an arrest. no one will confirm the information. u.s. officials tell fox to be "cautious," about reports of arrests. according to reuters, quoting libya's interior minister four men are in custody and under investigation suspected of helping events at the u.s. consulate. "helping." f.b.i. and others are on the ground in the early stages of the investigation. top priority here? find out whether the strike on the consulate was a planned assault by terrorists rather than a rampageing mob angry other antimuslim video. catherine is in washington, dc, first on the reported arrests. >> this afternoon, the intelligence community is trying to knock down the report. this question was put to the state department. i saw the press reports before i came down. i was not able to confirm them. obviously, it would be a good thing if we are moving forward on thi
managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
the united states as the move towards a democracy. the obama administration has said it is considering using sanctions against myanmar, also known as burma. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> well, welcome to all of you. this is my first official of bent as the new president. what a thrill, frankly, to be here with you. her first visit to the united states in 20 years. no. a 40 years. and she chose to come to the institute for her first public address. we have wonderful partners in the society. and the blue moon a society. we have a great relationship with the state department of secretary clinton today. a number of her colleagues are here. kurt campbell. in addition, i would like to particularly recognize a couple of our board members. without her, i do not think this event would have occurred. i would like to thank her for coming. i like to turn things over. [applause] >> i join with jim. i want to tell you that this is an extremely large and important a pleasure that we have in welcoming all of you here today. it is an event in honor of remarkable individual. we welcome you and your dele
last october at the values voter summit. it has been crisscrossing the united states registering voters of sporting concerted candidates are running for office, and shining the light on this administration and its failed policies. please take a few minutes to step on board between new and to, today and tomorrow. it's parked recognize the exhibit hall. just follow the signs. you can't miss it. speaking of the exhibit hall we are delighted to have many profamily conservative organizations from all over the country or exhibiting with us. in fact, the second year in a row with so many we had to overflow in the air on the other side of the exhibit hall and was called birdcage walk. we plan to visit these wonderful exhibitors and to show them your appreciation for all the work they do. we are pleased to have our good friend of the media research center again as or sponsor of new media wrote located in the ballroom and, of course, you'll be hearing from a president roosevelt later in the program. almost finished. hang in there. i'm trying to make these announcements as dynamic as possible. [la
to take action against terrorist the plots. whether it confronts us here in the united states or abroad. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts
steer america towards a fiscal cliff. we have voted 65 days this year in the united states senate. there are a number of things. you raise the one about the payroll tax cut, we haven't passed an appropriations bill this year. why is that? harry reid laid it out earlier in "the national journal." forget passing bills, the democrats want to pass the blame game. i see this. we haven't figured out if they are going to pay doctors next year. 30% cut. the president says he has extended the life of medicare, only if he lowers what they pay doctors who take care of doctors 30% and freezes that for the next 10 years. for somebody on medicare, they will have a difficult time finding a doctor to take care of them. host: it appears something fleeds to be done. your payroll tax conferee last year agreed to extend the payroll tax cut holiday for another year. are you in favor of doing so again? guest: i voted against the conference committee report. i don't think it's going to be extended this year. we are looking at tax rates going up. death tax coming back in a much more onerous way. there is
in the foreign service, he won friends to the united states in far-flung places. he made those people's hopes his own. during the revolution in libya, he risked his life to help protect the libyan people from a tyrant. he gave his life helping them build a better country. people loved to work with him. as he rose through the ranks, they loved to work forehand. he was known not only for his courage, but for his smile. goofy, but contagious. for his sense of fun and that california cool. in the days since the attack, so many libyans, including the ambassador, who is with us today, have expressed their sorrow and solidarity. one young woman, her head covered and her eyes haunted with sadness, held up a handwritten sign that said "thugs and killers do not represent a benghazi or islam." the president of the palestinian authority, who worked closely with chris sent me a letter of remembering his energy and integrity and deploring "an act of ugly terror." many others from across the middle east and africa have offered similar sentiments. this has been a difficult week for the state department's and for
was left an odd man out. steve found solace in studying the writings of captain alfred of the united states navy. probably one of the most influential and large it's forgotten military the interests of his state. one of the first strategist understand what we call geopolitics, the idea that nations and cultures are largely shaped by their geography and their ability to defend themselves or to attack others is governed primarily by their waterways. importantly, man was a close friend. he would count was station off the coast of peru. one day he is relaxing in the english slaver reading a book on the worst. he was hit by an important epiphany. all that business of hannibal crossing the alps with elephants to attack from was a large waste of time and money. if cartages have had a sufficient navy to defeat the room and navy there would have been no need to cross the straits of gibraltar campaign up through spain and crossed the pyrenees and the alps and finally down into italy because he could simply sale of the mediterranean attack from directly. inspired by his new understanding of navies and
judiciary led the way to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and oral brennan to the supreme court, but the host of liberal republicans such as the president appointed himself like albert title of georgia and john of louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment i think that eisenhower made at that time is that of john marshall hall of the great conservative justice and just after the landmark decision in brown v board of education. shortly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died leaving the vacancy on the court, and at that point roosevelt turned to the grandson of the great marshall harlem who would be the only dissenter in percy versus ferguson and 1896, the case legalized segregation by appointing the great dissenter eisenhower was making a statement he could not have adored. he said eisenhower was going to enforce it. when the segregation attempted to swap the integration in little rock eisenhower sent
do they talk about the united states and how do they talk about the union and the confederacy. how do they talk about the south that it would substantially different from each other and voila i would have something to say so i headed off into the archives. >> first of all but archives? >> archive server every state that fought in the war in this book. some are the huge ones that immediately come to mind the library of congress or carlisle barracks in pennsylvania which has an enormous army history collection but also smaller libraries state historical associations, the alabama department of the agriculture the vermont historical society in independence misery and again the point was i didn't want to read more about u.s. grant i wanted to be about the back of the line so that's why i looked for him. i look at the flag and i think of my farm or my wife and mother they didn't cooperate and do what i wanted them to do and i was frustrated with them for that reason petraeus too were you find a similar thing before the union and confederate soldiers? >> two things. i knew the union and conf
shakes the resolve of the united states of america. >> earlier today secretary of state hillary clinton stepped up her criticism of the anti-muslim film that first prompted the protests. >> to us, to me personally, this video is disgusting and reprehensib reprehensible. it appears to have a deeply cynical purpose to denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage. >> joining me now live from cairo, nbc's similar maceda. give us the best description of how things are right now. >> reporter: well, ironically benghazi remained calm today. if you look at it, perhaps the libyan government's quick crackdown there on those alleged perpetrators. four individuals were arrested today. there's a manhunt going on that might have had a tamping-down effort. even there in benghazi, the u.s. government is taking no chances. we understand that all u.s. personnel has now been or have been evacuated to tripoli and only emergency staff are kept at the embassy here. here in cairo it's another 24 hours of protests against that made in usa anti-islam film. overnight last night some dramatic scenes near the u.s
people. because the senate bill was inclusive and every woman member , republican, of the united states senate voted for it. everyone. that was the difference between the two bills. those who were included and a more specific group that are now included, which we think they ought to be, but we also think there aren't people include who had need to be. with all due respect i think my characterization was absolutely accurate. but it's interesting, mr. speaker, that we still haven't eabed the question -- answered the question. we tend to want to talk about other things. 98% of americans should not get a tax increase on january 1 that are making less than $250,000 individually as a family. i think we agree on that. mr. speaker, now i haven't heard that we don't agree on that but we agree on that which means there are 2% on which we do not agree. and that bill has not been brought to the floor that passed the united states senate dealing with that 98%. or 97% of small business. now, mr. speaker, it seems to me if we have agreement on 98% and the president of the united states will sign that
to the united states from the other states of the european union over for lunch. okay? germans in the chair, ambassadors from america, from the e.u. states over for lunch. he would then have an american coming in and be the lunchtime entertainment. the american-led come and give the lunchtime talk. i'm not sure who else was there. i would expect the secretary of state was invited, secretary defense. and the central intelligence agency. so i get invited and say okay, i've got a representative from every country in the european union. what makes an interesting speech? i've got it. let's talk about reconditions, interrogations'. so i did. [laughter] and i began the conversation -- i had a great staff at the cia. you are blessed as a people with the talent and morality of the folks in your service and i had a wonderful stuff and great speeches. was rear i would let anybody go with almost irresistible temptation to fool around with someone else's and i would make changes, but this was so important. an awful lot of it i wrote, and i remember page two or page three of the speech, you know, about m
] in the united states senate. still fighting for those who count on him to be their voice. using his intellect and his he will consequence he has fought to improve our health care choices and to protect our environment. and he called attention to the threat of terrorism before september 11. [applause] you know, i married the smartest, toughest, sweetest man i know. and in two days we will celebrate 27 years of marriage. [cheers and applause] the way we always do. we'll do it the way we always do, at wendy's. [laughter] whether it's wendy's or washington, i found that it's true. it's not where you go, it's who you go with. [cheers and applause] but none of the things i've mentioned are the reasons i married john edwards. i married him because he was the single most optimistic person that i have ever known. he knew there was a brighter day ahead even as he swept the floors in the cotton mill as a high school student. he knew if he worked hard enough, he could be the first in his family to go to college. he knew that he could outwork and outtough any battalion of lawyers to find justice. and he c
to millions suffering from hiv aids. second is to foster a substantial united states strategic interests. perhaps military or diplomatic or economic. third is another purpose and one that i think has to receive much more attention and higher priority. in a romney administration and that is aid that elevates people and brings about lasting change in communities and nations. here is an example. a lot of americans including myself are troubled by developments in the middle east. syria has witnessed the killing of tens of thousands of people. the presidents of egypt is a member of the muslim brotherhood. our ambassador to libya was assassinated in a terrorist attack. iran is moving toward nuclear weapons capability. we somehow feel we are at the mercy of events rather than shaping events. i am often asked why. what can we do about it? to ease the suffering and enter and the hate and violence? religious extremism is part of a problem but that is not the whole story. the population of the middle east is very young particularly in comparison to the population of the developed nations. typically
to social equality, racial equality in the united states. and it was not just the appointments of earl warren and william brennan to supreme court. it was a host of liberal republicans that roosevelt appointed himself. men like elbert tuttle of georgia and john wants in a louisiana. these were the judges that were in the vanguard of the civil rights struggle. but the most significant judicial appointment, i think, that eisenhower made at the time, was that of john marshall harlan, great conservative justice, just after the court's landmark decision in brown versus board of education. certainly after that decision came down, justice robert jackson died, leaving a vacancy on the court. at that point, roosevelt turned to harlem, who is the grandson of the great john marshall harlan, who had been the only dissenter in 1896, a place that utilized segregation, by pointing harlem, the main gate of the great dissenter, eisenhower was making a statement of the south could not ignore. desegregation was the law of the land and eisenhower was going to enforce it. when a mob attempted to block it,
in united states to shrink from our belief in universal rights. i think it's just the example we get to the rest of the world. and that example because of events in recent years and iraq and afghanistan and elsewhere, the fact that our political system is not functioning as smoothly as it might have at one point, not as smoothly as it could operate, i think we've lost a little bit of our ability to influence others in the world. we have to acknowledge that, and we have to regain that. and then they will perhaps start following some of the examples we've set forward. we are still the most successful country, i think, democracy and the world. i think we been an example to asia, an example to europe. the doctor mentioned the marshall plan. that brought europe to where it is now. and i always am amused that people say this change can't happen. look at my european friends, they are all social democrats and they all have teams in queens. so i mean, it can happen. >> okay, more questions. >> hello everybody. i am from belgium and i'm currently working for the washington quarterly. i'd like
smoke coming out of the u.s. embassy. they have replaced the united state flag. there are also reports they have taken over an american school there as well. fox is trying to confirm all of this. it is similar to what we are seeing and other countries, in particular lebanon. at least one person was killed in the protest. many more were wounded. this comes as pope benedict xvi arrived in lebanon. protesters they were seen ripping up his picture ahead of his visit to lebanon. here in afghanistan, we feared there would be widespread violence. so far, those have not materialized. it has been very peaceful here in kabul. there are real concerns that the rights will spread to afghanistan or pakistan in the coming days. melissa: connor, thank you for that report. lori: these are trying times, that is for sure. let's see how the markets are reacting. nicole petallides is on the floor of the new york stock exchange. nicole: we are keeping a close eye on some of the office product retailers. there is news. the first set of news is stapled it now has private equity firms interested in taking it p
or iran or turkey invoking the greatness of their own power and impact and the united states tends to be more future oriented but in this particular case you found that the trauma of the hostage crisis and in the iranian revolution is still very formative and the - of americans who are responsible for the iran policy. >> guest: it is. ambassador ryan crocker told me one time in an interview that they are the most historical were the least historical society. and in this case i think there's still certainly every time they have a negotiation including the most recent one in moscow during the whole litany of grievances, so it is always on their mind. whether the u.s. policy makers realize it or not, the are too. the first years after the revolution clearly the hostage issue was for most american policy makers mind. if the iran contra happens that causes the relationship with the next prior risk and we saw it happen to ronald reagan and over a series of instances where they have spurred u.s. efforts to the rapprochement. there's a great example like to give just on this idea of the mo
into the hands of terrorrests that could be used against the united states, and instead cnn went to the scene. so there are so many things that are so troubling, um, that whether it was lying or incompetence, to me, is almost beside the point. megyn: interesting point. >> they need to give us the information about what really happened and are they connecting the dots, are they looking at this and saying, you know, we had some pre-9/11 attacks that we now in hindsight know were, you know, we should have seen as a warning. are you looking at and trying to understand the context of this attack. megyn: and that's why these lawmakers are now seeking to get the actual cables, the communication -- >> that's right. >> megyn: -- between ambassador stevens and the state department so they could see where he was raising -- hold on -- raising the concerns expressed in that journal to his employers employd asked for an increased level of protection. monica, ten seconds, quickly. >> that's right. when the charge of cover up is raised, what are they covering up? why was ambassador stevens going to men gazty si
a second obama term and how the united states -- thanks. >> brief word on that. iran policy is going to be close to the center of this but let me make a more specific answer with the matter todd raised. missile defense. the obama administration would be interested in finding a way to smooth relations with russia over subsequent stages to european missile defense architecture. i don't know if president obama could just give vladimir putin a veto. i also don't think he is going to feel a hypothetical plan for 2018 developed a couple years ago needs to be seen and set in stone where governor romney because of his strong views towards russia would see it as a way to establish in backing off on the campaign trail even if language about russia and the top geostrategic threat was overstated and not something he chose for the convention speech but made it pretty clear in that speech that he does see the need to stand up to russia and european missile defense is an important case in point. the other thing i will mention is on strategic nuclear arms control. of the three people i have been men
. that's important. because that distinguishes him from the united states senate which also has a legal obligation to submit a budget and has refused to do so for the last three years. you wonder why it is we can't come together on funding priorities, madam speaker, three years the senate has said we are not going to tell you what we are interested in doing. we are not going to provide you with any ideas. and because we won't move it, the house product can't move, the president doesn't have anything to work with, and you see the kind of economic turmoil that we are in today. but the president to his credit has submitted a budget each and every year with his priorities. this is the budget he submitted for 2012. this was just last february, the law required it. he complied with it. but he's running for re-election and he's got his fingers on the pulse of the american people, but what they need and what they desire and what they want from the united states government, all tuned towards an election in november anti-budget that he submitted -- and the budget that he submitted raidses taxes a
than what i think the people of the world expected from the united states of america. and if i'm elected president of this country, i will get us back on a road of growth and prosperity and strength. >> woodruff: today at a campaign event in washington, president obama shared a message of what he called "economic patriotism" tied to a strong middle class. >> but our problems can be solved, our challenges can be met. we've still got the workers in the world, the best universities, the best scientists, the best... we got the best stuff. ( laughter ) we just got to bring it together. >> woodruff: consumer confidence is higher of late, and the president may be getting a boost from voter attitudes. an nbc news/"wall street journal" poll out last week found 42% of americans think the economy will improve in the next year. that's six points higher than a month ago. 18% say the economy will worsen, and almost a third expect it to stay the same. the obama campaign is also pointing to some revised job numbers to make its case. the u.s. bureau of labor statistics said yesterday there were
'm a forecaster, but we, you know, the united states is in this sort of very different position. you might argue japan, somewhat different circumstances, very high domestic savings rate, managed to sort of face a different set of constraints in that environment, but i ultimately agree with vince that, like, you have to deal with this problem, and you can't get around it. but we're operating under somewhat different constraints. >> john? >> yeah. which is everything's fine until it's not fine. but -- >> i didn't say not -- [laughter] >> the point is this time is different. [laughter] >> anyway, of course -- >> don't want to go there, vince? >> with yeah. >> all this precluding vince and ken's study was music to the ears of the folks at the imf who have had this view for some time that this is how these situations have to be, have to be dealt with. but certainly lew is right, everything doesn't have to get fixed today, but it's got to get fixed, and it's been the key, and the key is that it has to be that people have to have confidence that it will be fixed, and that's the tricky part; namely, how
, perhaps even the first latino president of the united states. he knows full well why he was picked to give this speech. in his words he said, i'm young, and i'm hispanic. >> hey, everybody. i'm julian castro. >> reporter: first thing you need to know, it's pronounced julian castro. the j is silent. not julian. but even if you get the spanish wrong, don't worry. san antonio's mayor has never mastered spanish either. >> i understand it better than i speak it. i grew up in my household with my mother and grandmother mostly speaking english. i understand it, but speaking it back is always the challenge. >> reporter: julian castro's grandmother immigrated from mexico and worked in the chicano movement in san antonio. from the humble beginnings, julian and his twin brother went on to stanford university and harvard law school. now he is a rising star in the democratic party, tapped to give the keynote speech at the democratic convention, the same speech an unknown barack obama gave at the convention in 2004. >> you get talked about as someone who could be the first hispanic governor of texas. so
, which says, the judicial power of the united states shall be vested in one supreme court and such inferior courts the congress may from time to time ordain and establish. and that is as article iii goes on and talks a bit about the jurisdiction of the court and so on, but many, many unanswered questions, including for instance no mention of the chief justice in article iii. we only inferred that are supposed to be a chief justice because he is given in article article ii, the presidential article, the right to preside over -- not the right, the duty to preside over the impeachment trial in the senate of the president of the united states. and remember, william rehnquist did that in the bill clinton impeachment trial and when he was later asked what it had amounted to, he said i did nothing in particular and i did it very well. so the duties of the chief justice are undefined. and much about the supreme court initially with undefined. so it really had to create itself and it's done so not in a straight line progression, but it's done so true askew says some of the cases th
candidates for president of the united states, sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. the candidates are: independent candidate ross perot, governor bill clinton, the democratic nominee, and president george bush, the republican nominee. i am jim lehrer of the macneil- lehrer news hour on pbs, and i will be the moderator for this 90-minute event, which is taking place before an audience in the athletic complex on the campus of washington university in st. louis, missouri. three journalists will be asking questions tonight. they are john mashek of the boston globe, ann compton of abc news, and sander vanocur, a freelance journalist. we will follow a format agreed to by representatives of the clinton and bush campaigns. that agreement contains no restrictions on the content or subject matter of the questions. each candidate will have up to 2 minutes for a closing statement. the order of those, as well as the questioning, was determined by a drawing. the first question goes to mr. perot. he will have 2 minutes to answer, to be followed by rebuttals of one minute each fro
>> there is no the community in the united states of america the votes overwhelmingly 90% for one party. in 1996 i realized we voted republican. we only -- were the only race in the united states of america that is done. it's created a system that decided the republican party where republicans say we've got to win without them. so somebody starts with whether they are racist or not racist, people say stupid things in both parties. i used to get into that debate. i don't anymore. i'm just about trying to build people up, not tear people down. so that was a stupid discussion. do i think that is reflective of the whole party? now i don't. i don't publicly that. my point, i'm not trying to defend him. i don't come to these discussions trying to defend republicans nor do i come trying to defend democrats. i comes and here's what i believe and here's what i support. getting back to the point, if were able to look at some kind of model where we to 20% of the african-american committee and we said okay, you be a democrat, get engaged, go work on the hill, be a big fundraiser, to the polic
competitors to step up the game in order for mcdonald's to start missing here in the united states. what will mcdonald's force to be done? and will that be good from an investor standpoint? how much will they have to give up maybe in terms of margins in order to get those customers back, for instance? >> you know, i think it's a combination of being more aggressive on the dollar menu. they will give a little bit on the margin side and we have near term caution on that particular point. but i also think they have a pretty nice product pipeline shaping up for 2013, which gives us excitement, and it's one of the reasons why mcdonald's is one of our favorite medium term names in the space. we do have some caution based on more difficult comparisons that show up in the fourth quarter as well as the threat of higher food costs that are going to pay out early next year. >> we should point out that with 104th on the price target. jim, we hear again from r.j. about food costs. actually the flip side of this is that we have a very weak labor market in the united states. so for as long as we're not
american forces, became two-term president of the united states and the for some reason the los angeles press corps was paralyzed in place. so i stepped forward and i began asking questions of what i called, general eisenhower. i didn't call him the president because, to me had always been a general. we had really good exchange. and in which he said he wanted reagan to run as a favorite son in six at this it. -- '68. you thought that with be good for the party around good for the country. that was in his own way a shot at rich richard nixon. >> guest: boom, you write, one minute ike and man in gray flannel suit in the lonely crowd and next minute, tune on, tune in, drop out, time for we shall overcome and burn baby burn. while americans were walking on the moon, americans were dying in vietnam. there were assassinations and riots. jackie kennedy became jackie o. ty e-die shirts rpt martin luther king, jr. george wallace, tom hayden and. mick jagger and wayne newton. well you get the idea, boom. >> guest: i don't want to overstate this seldom in our recent history at least has there been
the very stylish, 34-year-old first lady of the united states surrounded by all these dashing people and then that came to an end. and the war began to heat up and suddenly the country seemed, seemed to come unhinged in a way. all the values of the world war ii generation come home with challenged within their own families. institutions of government, place of government in our lives. the idea of loyaltity and patriotism all went out the window. civil rights movement went from nonviolent movement led by dr. king depending on rule of law, it went to the streets. you know, violence in america is as as american as cherry pie. so it was a, it was a head-snapping time. there was no question about it and the fact that we emerged from it and reasonably good shape is still fairly astonishing to me. it is a real tribute to the tense aisle strength of this country in a lot of ways. >> host: i began my marriage, tom brokaw writes and my career as journalist in 1962, a straight arrow product of the 1960s. by the time decade was over i had my first taste of the marijuana, i had long hair and week
-islam internet movie made in the united states that washington has publicly and repeatedly denounced. >> the united states government had absolutely nothing to do with this video. we absolutely reject its content and message. >> reporter: the protesters aren't listening to that. authorities in cairo are erecting new walls around the embassy to prevent mobs from getting close, evidence in concrete of the growing divide between washington, cairo and beyond. there have been demonstrations against the offensive video in 11 countries so far. half of them in places where washington supported arab spring uprisings that toppled strong men who had formerly been u.s. allies. the arab spring has taken a dark turn. in yemen on thursday, protesters managed to break into the parking lot of the embassy in sanaa, destroying vehicles, smashing windows and even using a forklift to do more damage. no embassy staff was hurt. entering this volatile region now, the pope, leaving rome today for a previously scheduled visit to lebanon. so far there hasn't been any violence there. but today is friday, the mu
is from the israeliss, we are willing to delay a military strike, which the united states has said they want the israelis to do, if america makes some kind of public promise about an attack. so far the words from secretary clinton though don't seem to show the united states is willing to do that, martha. martha: so, there has been a lot of discussion about perhaps an imminent attack coming from israel to takeout some of those facilities. where does all that stand now? >> reporter: if you read the israeli papers in the past month or so they said an attack was virtually guaranteed before the u.s. elections in november. that rhetoric has been dialed down. whether that is intentional as a head fake or that is really going on is yet to be seen. it's very clear that the israelis need to strike sooner than the americans do because the israelis have a much, much more limited long-range bombing capability. either way you can get a feeling from the ground here by what is in the papers. this is one of the main israeli dailies i want to show you from this weekend. this is a picture of all the
countries in the world are still going down, united states is climbing. frankly we have climbed faster if we'd been able to implement the full set of policies this president had wanted to and not been blocked by that congress with 12% approval that you were talking about a little earlier. >> the problem with this though is that as people go to the polls in 57 days they have to make a choice as to which president is going to do more for the economy. and if president barack obama is re-elected, and you still have the intransigence in washington that we have seen for the last 3 1/2 years, nothing more is going to get done. so doesn't that auger for mitt romney being elected? because he'll have a friendlier congress? >> hardly. president obama wants to take us in the right direction. he wants to stop teachers from being laid off. he wants to take advantage of a moment with 2% interest rates, less than 2% interest rates, with construction unemployment in excess of 15% to fix the nation's schools, to build the nation's infrastructure. he wants to support the federal reserve in keeping interest rat
case ending racial violence, like supremacy in the united states. but they don't come out and say that. fatality and story to convey that. and so michener is conveying roosevelt's interpretation of world war ii. i'm not going to talk much about the movies. you can ask me about the movies because that would take all of next year's program probably to do that, that happy to talk about. it's talk about the memorials. now, some of you have gone to see the world war ii memorial in washington, d.c. you see the arches, the patriarchs and the atlantic and pacific. 400,000 american dead but they are represented by gold stars. so you don't get the griping of you don't get the trauma, you don't get the body parts, you get the gold star. that's the traditional view of the war. it's not that it is a wrong view, but it's not the only view. it wasn't the only view among those who fought the war in the '40s and '50s. when i was a kid in school, we used to have these covers on their school textbooks and they always had rendition of the iwo jima memorial in washington. there you've got these marines fus
a love for freedom and those rights in the united states of america. and we care so much about them that we're willing to protect other people's rights around the world and we stand for that and it's about leadership. and it's a the a time now when other countries in the world, more and more of them are not willing to step up. you saw that at the end of the 20th of the century, when milosevic, no one was lifting a finger. 250,000 were killed until america stepped in. it's mostly american leadership standing up for human rights. >> alisyn: we'll see if we hear more about this at the dnc and from mitt romney on the campaign trail. thank you for coming in. >> thank you, ali. >> alisyn: you, too. the founder of the islamic for recommend is going to weigh in. the president's beer recipe is no longer a secret. we'll weigh in next. ♪ get two times the points on travel, with chase sapphire preferred. [ wife ] your dad's really giving him the business... the designated hitter's the best thing to happen to baseball! but it's not the same game! [ wife ] wow, he's really gonna get us a good d
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